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Mauritania’s Pastoralists Pioneered Communities Built Entirely Of Large Stones Thousands Of Years Ago

Ancient<a href=httpshowafricacom> <a>Ksour<a href=httpshowafricacom> <a>of Ouadane Chinguetti Tichitt and Oualata Mauritania Photo UNESCO © John Spooner

 

The Tichitt-Walata region of Mauritania is thought to be one of the oldest archaeological sites in Western Africa. Following the discovery of massive stone villages going back to 1100 BC, it was home to over 500 stone settlements in the ancient Sahara Savannah region.

According to African History, the inhabitants used architectural technology to build their communities with massive cut stones and link the pathways to the settlements in a circular configuration. Dhar Tichitt is one of Mauritania’s historical Stone Age monuments, located in the southwestern Sahara desert. Pastoralists lived on the sandstone cliffs between 2500 and 500 BCE. The Dhar Tichitt is one of numerous settler community sites constructed with huge stones.

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To supplement their dietary needs, the residents engaged in fishing, hunting, and gathering wild cereals such as grains and millet. It is one among the places where the inhabitants are known to have transitioned from the Stone Age hunter-gatherer civilization to the pastoralist mode of life as the climate changed.

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According to researchers, this could explain why approximately 4500 pastoralists were discovered in Dhar Tichitt. Because of the favorable environment, the area provided enough grass for the pastoralists to feed their livestock. Many of the settlements were occupied during the rainy season, while others were visited during the dry season.

To supplement their dietary needs, the residents engaged in fishing, hunting, and gathering wild cereals such as grains and millet. It is one among the places where the inhabitants are known to have transitioned from the Stone Age hunter-gatherer civilization to the pastoralist mode of life as the climate changed.

According to researchers, this could explain why approximately 4500 pastoralists were discovered in Dhar Tichitt. Because of the favorable environment, the area provided enough grass for the pastoralists to feed their livestock. Many of the towns were populated during the wet season, while others were visited during the dry season.

Large stone walls had been built around several settlements, apparently for outdoor gatherings like as feasts and town hall durbars. The archaeologists have the impression that the building was intended to foster a sense of community and neighborliness among the inhabitants. The Soninke people are said to be the ancestors of these pastoralists.

The prevalence of animals in the region today, namely goats, sheep, and cattle, is attributable to the low-lying area’s vegetative cover. Historians believe that the Dhar Tichitt people’s culture vanished with the growth of the Sahara desert throughout time.

The people are thought to have relocated to other parts of Western Africa in order to sustain the lives of their cattle in the face of increasing pressure from desert nomads. Only the historical sites in the Koumbi Saleh are regarded to be comparable to Dhar Tichitt in terms of architecture and culture.

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Written by How Africa News

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