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The Georgia Infirmary: 5 Interesting Facts About the First Chartered Hospital For African Americans!!

Slaves who were poorly treated and living in poor conditions were often left in poor health. These slaves were usually casted out by their owners when they no longer  were able to pull their own weight and work. So, to help with this major problem throughout the south, the first infirmary in Georgia for blacks was established. Here are 5 interesting facts you should know about the hospital Georgia Infirmary.

Georgia Infirmary

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1.  The Georgia infirmary was first chartered on December 24, 1832. It was located in Savannah, Georgia and was the first hospital that was established for African-Americans in the United States. The hospital was established by the Georgia Assembly and funded by a $ 10,000 grant from the estate of a local merchant and minister.

2. The Infirmary was built 10 miles south of Savannah, Georgia, on a 50-acre parcel of land donated by Richard F. Williams, the brother and executor of Thomas F. Williams’ estate. Richard F. Williams was elected as the first president of the hospital’s board of trustees. Upon the infirmary’s opening, the state government provided $20 per patient a year.  Williams’ grant, as well as proposals for the state of Georgia were to take on the care of old and unwell slaves.

3. The operation of the hospital was disrupted during the Civil War and emancipation, but in 1870 twelve new trustees convened, and the hospital received a hefty donation to open its doors once again. The following year, the Savannah City Council was notified the Infirmary would once again be admitting patients. In 1904, the Infirmary was among the first in the nation to train black nurses.

4. During the 1940s, it was expanded to meet demand from a rapidly growing population moving to Savannah to work in shipyards and productions plants meeting orders for World War II. By the end of its first year, the hospital showed a balance of 56.82 dollars. This was a small sum but a hopeful sign.

5. Although it was renamed in 1974 the “Adult Day Center, it now provides rehabilitation for stroke patients.

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Written by How Africa

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