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See the Little Ghanaian Boy, Jake Amo Who Broke the Internet

During October, different web photograph pics appeared highlighting a Ghanaian little child ingested in his fine art. The kid turned into a viral sensation crosswise over interpersonal organizations in Nigeria, Southafrica, Ghana, and now the full, motivational story behind the photograph has been uncovered.

This is Africa, the first 2015 photograph of the kid, Jake Amo, was taken by American picture taker Carlos Cortes. Cortes was in the nation, taking after famous Ghanaian craftsman Solomon Adufah, who was coming back to his nation of origin subsequent to experiencing childhood in the US.

The two visited a pre-school in the village of Asempanaye, in the Koforidua region, as part of Adufah’s project to promote art classes in Ghanaian schools, where the image of Jake was taken.

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Image result for Jake Amo,

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Image result for Jake Amo,

Adufah shared one of Cortes’s photos on Instagram in January 2016, to help to promote his project. But it was only in September and October that South African internet users took to remixing the photo into comic memes.

But it’s not all about the laughs. Thanks to the popularity of the meme and the story behind it, people have started to contribute to Adufah’s art initiative, Homeland Ghana, raising more than $4 000 within 48 hours for art education in and art supplies for Ghanaian schools.

Dear Internet, let’s donate to Jake. The kid we have had fun with. Let’s be as enthusiastic about donating. https://t.co/wYdnKnma2s pic.twitter.com/w1i0cWuS6Q

Source: This is Africa

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Written by How Africa

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