in

Profiling Minnesota’s First Black Policewoman Who Earned A Bachelor’s Degree At 79

Ethel<a href=httpshowafricacom> <a>Ray<a href=httpshowafricacom> <a>NancePhoto via Mnopedia

 

Ethel Ray Nance, a civil rights activist, had a passion for taking notes, which inspired her to train in stenography while still in high school. In 1919, she began working as a stenographer for the Minnesota Forest Fires Relief Commission.

When she was hired as a stenographer at the Minnesota State Legislature in 1923, she made national headlines. She was the first African American woman to serve in the legislature. Nance went on to work for the New York Urban League magazine, Opportunity. In 1924, she met with Charles S. Johnson, the director of research and editor of Opportunity.

ALSO READ:  US Rep, Lauren Underwood Wins Reelection In Illinois House Race

She worked for Opportunity as Johnson’s secretary, writer, and researcher. This compelled her to move to New York. During the Harlem Renaissance, she offered her New York residence to young writers and artists so they could explore their artistic impressions. Nance, on the other hand, had to leave her job in 1928 to care for her sick mother in Minnesota.

Loading...

During this time, she became the first African-American police officer in Minnesota after the Minneapolis Police Department established its first women’s bureau. She worked at the unit until 1931, when she was forced to retire due to severe arthritis.

ALSO READ:  Woman Arrested After Refusing To Return $1.2m Mistakenly Deposited Into Her Account

She worked for Opportunity as Johnson’s secretary, writer, and researcher. This compelled her to move to New York. During the Harlem Renaissance, she offered her New York residence to young writers and artists so they could explore their artistic impressions. Nance, on the other hand, had to leave her job in 1928 to care for her sick mother in Minnesota.

During this time, she became the first African-American police officer in Minnesota after the Minneapolis Police Department established its first women’s bureau. She worked at the unit until 1931, when she was forced to retire due to severe arthritis.

When her father witnessed the barbaric lynching of three Black men accused of raping a white woman in Duluth in 1920, he founded the NAACP branch there. Nance’s father was shocked to learn that the men were being hanged four blocks from their Duluth home.

Civil rights activist W.E.B. Du Bois once spoke at one of Duluth’s NAACP meetings. Nance had the opportunity to meet Du Bois, and when she moved to San Francisco with her family in 1945, she became his secretary. Du Bois had a contract as a consultant to the American delegation when the United Nations was established.

Nance spent ten years at the NAACP’s West Coast Regional Office in San Francisco, where he helped establish the San Francisco African American Historical and Cultural Society. At the age of 79, she became the oldest person to receive a bachelor’s degree from the University of San Francisco. Nance died on July 11, 1992, at the age of 93, in San Francisco.

 

Loading...

Written by How Africa News

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

one × 4 =

How I Started A Wildly Successful Food Truck And Restaurant By Accident – Derrick Bivens 

Black Woman Whose Whiskey Brand Made History Crossing $100M In Sales Now Owns A Bank