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Only 16 Million Africans Have Been Fully Vaccinated Against COVID-19 – WHO

A handout picture taken on March 11, 2021, and released by Urugwiro Village, the office of the President, shows Rwanda’s President Paul Kagame (L) receiving the first injection of the Covid-19 vaccine at King Faisal hospital in Kigali, Rwanda. (Photo by – / Urugwiro Village / AFP)

 

The World Health Organization has on Thursday said that so far, only 16 million (or less than 2%) of Africans are now fully vaccinated.

 

According to WHO, 50 million COVID-19 vaccine doses have been administered in Africa, this accounts for just 1.6% of doses administered globally.

 

“This means that hundreds of millions of people are still vulnerable to infection.” WHO Regional Director for Africa Dr. Matshidiso Moeti said.

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Dr. Moeti who was speaking at a press briefing on the COVID-19 third wave, new variants & vaccines rollout in Africa said that, “after coming to a virtual halt in early June, vaccine shipments are gathering momentum. In the last two weeks, more than 1.6 million doses have been delivered to Africa through the COVAX Facility.”
The Regional Director also announced that sixteen African countries are now in resurgence, with Malawi and Senegal added this week, adding that the Delta variant has been detected in 10 of these countries.
“New cases have increased for the seventh week running. For Africa, the worst is yet to come as the fast moving third wave continues to gain speed and new ground.”
“Africa has just marked its worst pandemic week ever, surpassing the second wave peak. During the week which ended on 4 July, there were more than 251,000 cases – a 20% increase over the previous week.” Dr. Moeti said.
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Written by PH

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