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Meet Alphonso Davies; A Former Liberian Refugee Currently Shaking the Football World

Alphonso Davies is not very well known in the high-profile world of football but it is a hope that will make things happen in the coming years. His departure from the United States to one of the best in Europe is not passed over. The striker was wrapped up by Bayern Munich at just 17 with a record transfer from the Whitecaps Major League Soccer (MLS).

His $ 13 million transfer fee makes him the most expensive MLS player of all time. Young but with a potential that justifies his shot and now many hopes are resting on him in the perspective of the Bundesliga season.

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And for a good part of the year, the teenager proved worthy of the high price, dazzling in the US championship and with the Canadian national team for which he plays.

Refugee in Ghana

Born in 2000 in a Ghanaian refugee camp of Liberian parents fleeing civil war in their country, Alphonso Davies arrived in Canada at age 5 with his parents as a refugee. His talent will force things before allowing him to become Canadian citizens one month before the start of the 2017 Golden Cup tournament.

During this competition, Davies makes history. At 16, he became the youngest player on Canada’s men’s national team. He also became the youngest striker in Canada and the youngest player to score in the CONCACAF Gold Cup. He finished the tournament as the top scorer.

Despite his young age he has already played 68 times for the Vancouver Whitecaps senior team and six times for Canada. He is also the first player born in the 2000s to play in an MLS match.

Now he will be scrutinized far from the American continent, Bayern Munich he joined a few weeks ago on record figures. The little refugee is about to shake the football world.

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Written by How Africa

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