in ,

Last Remains Of Ethiopian Plane Crash Victims Finally Buried

Children from surrounding homesteads stand in front of a flower memorial held for victims at the crash site of an Ethiopian airways operated by a Boeing 737 MAX aircraft on March 16, 2019 at Hama Quntushele village near Bishoftu in Oromia region. – The second crash involving the 737 MAX series has spurred reaction among international airline operators to ground Boeing 737 Max aircraft in their fleets. (Photo by TONY KARUMBA / AFP) (Photo credit should read TONY KARUMBA/AFP/Getty Images)

The last remains of 157 people killed aboard an Ethiopian Airlines plane in March were interred at the crash site this week, farmers and families told Reuters, but some relatives were upset they had been unable to take part in the ceremony.

Loading...

Nadia Milleron, whose daughter Samya Stumo was killed, said an email was sent to some families but not all  notifying them of the burial just two days before it happened.

“By the time the burial took place I was just wiped out; I was just glad they were doing it. I was tired of it not being done,” said Milleron. “But a lot of people didn’t feel like that. They hadn’t been aware of what was happening.”

Ethiopian Airlines did not return calls seeking comment about why some families were not told in advance.

Families have been begging the airline to fill in the crater left by the March 10 crash, which still contained remains too small to be recovered.

Milleron said on Saturday that locals had been burying remains exposed by rains in small mounds of earth. She herself found a bone at the site when she visited Ethiopia to collect her daughter’s remains in October, which she told the airline about in an email.

The force of the impact meant no complete bodies were recovered; partial remains were tested for DNA and finally returned to families last month.

Boeing manufactured the 737 MAX 8 plane, which nosedived shortly after take-off. A preliminary investigation pointed to a malfunctioning anti-stall system known as MCAS, which was also implicated in the crash of a Lion Air plane in Indonesia five months earlier. All 189 people onboard that flight were killed.

Some bereaved families have formed associations and hope to use funds from Boeing to build a memorial. The manufacturer will make $100 million available, with half going to families and half to projects in local communities.

Loading...

Written by PH

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

CAPTCHA


Rwanda’s GDP Projected To Grow By 8.5% In 2019

Sierra Leone First Lady, Fatima Maada Bio Calls For Women Empowerment In Africa