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Ghana, South Africa are the Most Preferred African Study Destinations for US Students in Sub-Saharan Africa

Ghana ranked as the second most popular country in Africa where US students are acquiring education.

Ghana’s Students Loan Trust Fund threatens to publish names, pictures of defaulters after owing the fund more than GH¢75 million
Ghana’s Students Loan Trust Fund threatens to publish names, pictures of defaulters after owing the fund more than GH¢75 million

Ghana comes second to South Africa.

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This is according to the 2019 Open Doors Report on international education. The report showed that in 2018 the number of US students attending universities and colleges in Ghana has increased from 1,865 to 2,210. This is an 18.5% increase from the previous year.

In 2018 South Africa saw 6,001 US students come to the country for education. This represents a marginal decline of 0.7% from its 6042 students in 2017.

By this figure, Ghana is the only country in Sub Saharan Africa that has experienced the largest growth.

Meanwhile, Benin, Nigeria, Sierra Leone in West Africa recorded marginal growth as a study destination for Americans schooling abroad.

Currently, Sub Saharan Africa hosts 14,416 US students which is 4% of the total number of the country’s study abroad population.

Ghana also recorded an increase in the number of Ghanaian students attending universities and colleges in the United States.

The number of Ghanaian students attending universities and colleges in the United States is now 3,661. That is an increase of 13.9% from the previous year.

This makes Ghana the second African country with the most students in the US. This was a spot previously held by Kenya. Nigeria holds the number one spot with 13,423 students.

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Written by How Africa

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