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A Contraceptive Pill for Men Successfully Tested at the University of Washington

The development of a “male contraceptive pill” is a step closer to reality after successfully passing human security tests.

This contraceptive pill, which can significantly reduce the level of two hormones needed for sperm production, may be available by 2029.

Researchers at the University of Washington conducted tests on 40 healthy men aged 18 to 50 years. They took the pill 11-beta-methyl-19-nortestosterone dodecylcarbonate every day for 28 days, or abbreviatedly 11-beta-MNTDC.

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The study found that the hormone levels of men who took the capsules had dropped, suggesting that the amount of sperm had been reduced.

The main objective of the first phase of the study was to evaluate the safety of this pill. The next step is to carry out a longer test to determine if the sperm reduction is large enough to be viable as a contraceptive.

Stephanie Page, a researcher at the University of Washington Medical School said, “The goal is to expand contraceptive options and create a menu of choice for men just as we do for women. We are neglecting a large population of potential users and the limited options currently available to men. “

The results of the study were presented on March 24 at ENDO 19, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society in New Orleans. Of the 40 participants, 10 received a placebo capsule, while the remaining 30 took variable doses of 11-beta-MNTDC – the same medication found in the current female contraceptive pill.

The study found that most men did not complain of any serious side effects. Some volunteers experienced headache, decreased libido, and mild erectile dysfunction.

None of the participants stopped taking the drug because of the side effects, and all passed the safety tests.

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Written by How Africa

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