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15 Inventors Who Were Murdered By Their Own Inventions

 

T.S. Eliot once said that “only those who will risk going too far can possibly find out how far one can go.” Unfortunately, the following inventors inadvertently went too far with their creations. In a cruel twist of fate, the innovative minds behind these progressive inventions fell victim to the risks they decided to take.

 

Marie Curie (1867-1934)
Curie is an icon in the science world and is credited with inventing the process to isolate radium (she was able to do this after co-discovering the radioactive elements radium and polonium). Unfortunately, the dangers of radiation were not common knowledge at the time and she died of aplastic anemia as a result of her continued exposure to radiation from her research.

Karel Soucek (1947-1985)
Soucek was a Canadian professional stuntman who invented a shock-absorbent barrel that he famously (and illegally) used to go over Niagara Falls in 1984. He used the same barrel to drop from the roof of the Houston Astrodome in 1985, a stunt which Evel Knievel described as the “most dangerous [stunt] I’ve ever seen.” He was fatally wounded when the barrel he was in hit the rim of the water tank that was meant to cushion his landing.

 

 

James Douglas (1581)
Douglas was the Fourth Earl of Morton who lived in Scotland under the reign of King James VI. In a cruel twist of fate, he’s most remembered for being executed in Edinburgh by the Maiden, a Scottish guillotine that he himself had introduced to the country during his term as Regent of Scotland.

Max Valier (1895-1930)
Valier was a pioneer of rocketry who lived in Austria. He’s best remembered for inventing a liquid-fueled rocket engine as a member of an elite German rocketeering society in 1920s Germany. In May of 1930, though, his own type of alcohol-fueled engine exploded on his test bench and struck him in the face, killing him instantly.

 

 

Li Si (208 BC)
The Five Punishments was a series of physical torture methods that was prominent in Ancient China. Li Si was a prime minister during the Qin dynasty, during which time he introduced the Five Pains method of punishment, which included tattooing someone’s face, cutting someone’s nose off or having the victim’s body cut into four separate pieces. In 208 BCE, Si was executed on criminal charges by the very method that he had helped create.
Jim Fixx (1932-1984)

Jim Fixx (1932-1984)
James Fuller Fixx was an American athlete and author who wrote the influential 1977 text “The Complete Book of Running.” He’s widely credited as being a founding father of the American fitness revolution. Running as a sport became much more popular because of him and he effectively publicized the health benefits of regular jogging. When Fixx was 52 years old, he died of a heart attack while out jogging.

 

Thomas Midgley, Jr. (1889-1944)
Midgley, Jr. was an American engineer and chemist who was left critically disabled after he was diagnosed with polio at age 51. He invented a system of ropes and pulleys that allowed others to help him get out of bed more easily. Unfortunately, at the age of 55, he became accidentally tangled up in the ropes of the device and he died of strangulation at the age of 55.
Thomas Andrews (1873-1912)

Thomas Andrews (1873-1912)
Andrews was an Irish businessman and shipbuilder who was the naval architect responsible for designing and building the famous ocean liner RMS Titanic. On the famous maiden voyage of the Titanic, Andrews was on board when it hit an iceberg on April 14, 1912. He was one of the 1,507 people on the Titanic to die in the accident.

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Alexander Bogdanov (1873-1928)

Alexander Bogdanov (1873-1928)
Alexander Bogdanov (1873-1928)
Bogdanov was a Russian physician and philosopher who was one of the first people to experiment with blood transfusion. Although his motives for experimenting with blood transfusion were centered around achieving eternal youth and reversing the aging process, he is still credited with scientific advancements in the field. However, Bogdanov died after he took the blood of a student who had both malaria and tuberculosis.
Michael Dacre (2009)

Michael Dacre (2009)
Michael Dacre (2009)
Michael Dacre invented the AVCEN Jetpod, which was nicknamed the “flying taxi” because of its capabilities of flying and landing within short distances in regional cities. In August 2009, Dacre died after testing a prototype of his device. He was the only occupant in the machine at the time.

 

Horace Lawson Hunley (1863)

Horace Lawson Hunley (1863)
Horace Lawson Hunley (1863)
Hunley was a marine engineer and inventor of the first combat submarine, called the CSS Hunley. He died in 1863 during a routine test of the submarine, which failed to resurface and ended up drowning Hunley and seven other crew members.
William Bullock (1813-1867)

William Bullock (1813-1867)
William Bullock (1813-1867)
Bullock is credited with inventing the web rotary printing press. Years after he invented it, his foot was crushed while he was helping install one in Philadelphia. The mutilated foot developed gangrene and Bullock ended up dying during an attempted amputation.

 

Sylvester H. Roper (1823-1896)

Sylvester H. Roper (1823-1896)
Sylvester H. Roper (1823-1896)
Roper invented the steam-powered bicycle, which is one of the earliest forms of the automobile. He died in June 1896 when he suffered a heart attack after crashing his bicycle during a public speed trial.
Otto Lilienthal (1848-1896)

Otto Lilienthal (1848-1896)
Otto Lilienthal (1848-1896)
Otto Lilienthal was a German aviation pioneer who was nicknamed “The Glider King.” He invented multiple types of successful gliders and hang-gliding devices. He died after falling 50 feet when one of his hang gliders malfunctioned in August of 1896.

Franz Reichelt (1879-1912)

Franz Reichelt (1879-1912)
Franz Reichelt (1879-1912)
Reichelt was a tailor who attempted to use his coat parachute invention to jump off the Eiffel Tower. He told authorities that he would test the suit with a dummy first, but he instead chose to experiment with it himself. He fell to his death from the first deck of the Eiffel Tower after the coat failed to operate as expected.

 

Source: Brainjet

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Written by PH

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