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11-Year-Old May Be Paralyzed After Being Shot By Teen Because Of Dispute Over Girl, Police Say

 

A 19-year-old Texas man is accused of shooting and injuring an 11-year-old boy who was involved in a dispute with the suspect’s younger cousin. Authorities said the dispute between the two middle school students was over a girl.

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According to ABC13, the suspected gunman, identified as Keandre Jackson, allegedly drove his little cousin to the victim’s home on Sunday and fired four shots into the residence. The 11-year-old victim suffered a gunshot wound to the neck, and he is likely paralyzed from the waist down.

Authorities said Jackson and his younger cousin had been threatening the 11-year-old about firing shots into his house as a result of a dispute the middle school students had over a girl. And prior to the shooting, deputies said some teenagers and the 11-year-old got into an argument at another residence. But a parent managed to briefly calm the altercation.

Jackson, however, drove his juvenile cousin to the home of the 11-year-old and fired four shots into his bedroom window, authorities said. The 11-year-old was hit in the neck, and he is said to be in a critical condition. Authorities also said the bullet is lodged in his neck. The victim’s mother also sustained a gunshot wound around her pelvic area.

Following the incident, court documents revealed the two returned home and bragged about shooting up the 11-year-old’s home, ABC13 reported. They were said to be having a sleepover at the time.

“If a middle schooler can provoke a person to commit such an act of violence with no regard for life and who was in that home, what is my ability to ensure community safety?” said the judge in court.

Jackson, who has since been arrested, is charged with two counts of aggravated assault with a deadly weapon. His bond was also set at $500,000.

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Written by PH

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