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10 Things We Learned from the 2018 World Cup; ‘Animals shouldn’t predict match results’

The 2018 World Cup has ended. It was an incredible tournament, full of surprises, with many memorable matches and a pretty interesting finale.

It is now time to take stock of the points that have marked us at this World Cup. In this article, find the 10 things we learned from the World Cup.

1. Video Arbitration (VAR) is not such a terrible idea

Football: 10 things we learned from the 2018 World Cup

When FIFA announced a few months ago the use of video arbitration in the world, it seemed like a bad idea.

But in reality, it worked pretty well. The disruption of the game has been reduced, it has given the referees more conviction in their decision-making and brought a greater degree of fairness to the game. However, there are still a number of imperfections to be settled. Several countries complained about the VAR at the World Cup.

2. The worst thing that can happen to you at the World Cup is to be the defending champion

Football: 10 things we learned from the 2018 World Cup

Germany became the third straight champion after Spain and Italy to leave the tournament in the group stage.

This is a curious phenomenon. How can a team go from grandeur to desperation in just four years? Be that as it may, France will have to prepare before going to Qatar in 2022.

3. Luka Modrić is the best midfielder in the world

Football: 10 things we learned from the 2018 World Cup

Luca Modric was incredible at the World Cup and despite the disappointment of losing the final, he was crowned the tournament’s best player, a well-deserved award. Throughout the competition, the Croatian showed no sign of fatigue. He totaled 694 minutes of play and covered 72¸3 kilometers.

4. Europe dominates the world in football

Football: 10 things we learned from the 2018 World Cup

The victory of France means that 12 of the 21 trophies of the World Cup were won by the European countries, the nine others having been won by the South American countries.

Given the huge investment made by Europe in the development of its football, it is hardly surprising that it dominates world football.

5. Always hold a position as coach

Football: 10 things we learned from the 2018 World Cup

Former Spain coach Julen Lopetegui said his dismissal after Real Madrid had recruited him was “the saddest day of his life since his mother’s death”. The president of the Spanish Football Federation said he had no choice but to dismiss Lopetegui.

6. Kylian Mbappé will be the big star of the next generation

Football: 10 things we learned from the 2018 World Cup

The French has won two Ligue 1 titles, the Coupe de France, the Coupe de la Ligue and he has just added to his winners the World Cup. He became the youngest player to score two goals in a World Cup game since Pele. At just 19, he has played 126 games, scoring 56 goals with 33 assists.

7. Teamwork remains an important concept in football

Football: 10 things we learned from the 2018 World Cup

England had an outstanding performance despite having a team considered one of the least favorite at the World Cup. Teamwork has helped Belgium, Croatia, Sweden and Japan to excel.

8. Animals should not predict match results

Rabio the octopus was sold and eaten despite his exact prediction regarding the matches of the Japan team. The cat from Beijing, White Cat was found dead after making seven correct predictions. Finally, the British pig Marcus had made a bad prediction on England. The animal predicted that Harry Kane and his teammates will not reach the quarter-finals.

9. There is no team as decent as Japan

Football: 10 things we learned from the 2018 World Cup

A 2-3 defeat in the 94th minute of their last game left Japan’s players in tears. However, they showed a good example. Before their departure, they are cleaned their cloakroom and left a message of thanks to Russia. Japanese fans did the same thing in their stands.

10. Never underestimate small teams

Football: 10 things we learned from the 2018 World Cup

The victory of France was not really a surprise, because she was one of the four big favorites, but there were a lot of surprises at this World Cup, the proof that one should never underestimate a team. Many of the smaller teams have performed well against large teams.

Mexico leading a tough group, Japan in the round of 16, Sweden in the quarter-finals, and Russia in a semifinal penalty are just a few examples of the tournament’s great surprises. Croatia’s qualification for the final was perhaps the biggest surprise of this competition.

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